Create Your Own FREE Survey | Typeform

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How to create surveys for
respondents
humans

& get more than 3X completion rates

How to create surveys for respondents humans

Why should I create a survey?

If done well, a survey can be one of the most useful assets to your business or organization. “But, isn’t it just a list of questions?” we hear you cry. Well, yes and no. Surveys can give you highly valuable insights into what your customers, audience, workforce, etc., are thinking, how they’re feeling, and why they are feeling it. There are many types of surveys, all with different objectives. Let’s look at some of the most common types.

Political Poll

Political Poll

Here’s an example of a quick and efficient political opinion survey, which respondents can easily complete on the go.

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Net Promoter Score

Net Promoter Score

This template shows how to measure customer loyalty with a few questions, and perhaps find out whether your customers are promoters, passives or detractors.

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Straw Poll

Straw Poll

Here’s a snippet of an opinion ballot designed to collect answers quickly and effectively. What’s more, it only takes minutes to build.

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Customer Satisfaction Survey

Customer Satisfaction Survey

This questionnaire example aims to measure and improve customer satisfaction. It pairs the right questions with attractive design, making an otherwise basic form enjoyable to fill.

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Facebook Poll

Facebook Poll

Here’s how a good Facebook poll should look like. You can stand out in your friends’ and followers’ news feed with an engaging conversation, likely to attract new likes and shares.

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Brand Awareness Survey

Brand Awareness Survey

This template efficiently measures brand awareness and perception in a fun, playful way. It pairs sleek design with a friendly tone, making the survey much easier to complete.

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Before releasing your survey into the wild, check that...

How to hold an interrogation a conversation

It’s something market researchers and feedback-seekers all too often forget—survey respondents are humans, not machines. Have you ever taken a survey? How did it make you feel? What was the survey-taking experience like? Did it frustrate you or bore you? Or did it delight you? Aim for the latter when creating your survey.

How to write survey questions with a purpose

Survey questions that are close-ended or quantitative will allow you to aggregate your data numerically. Examples of these are dropdown, multiple choice, rating, opinion scale, and yes/no questions. Their data is easy to analyze and draw conclusions from.

Survey questions that are open-ended or qualitative can provide new ideas or insight, because short-text or long-text questions allow the respondents to express themselves in more detail.

A comprehensive survey or questionnaire will include both close-ended and open-ended questions, but more of the former than the latter. For obvious reasons, it is much easier to draw actionable insights when the majority of the data is numerical.

How to create a survey with a clear objective

Ready to fill that blank page with survey questions? Hold your horses. You’ll need to think about what you want to accomplish with your online survey. Are you trying to measure customer satisfaction? Or, find out about your brand’s top-of-mind status within a particular segment of the population? What kinds of conclusions are you planning on drawing from your data? Sit down and think about the reasons you are sending out this survey in the first place. If you understand what you want to do with your data once you have it, your survey will be much more successful.

How to write survey questions for humans

Ready to write? Good survey questions are the key to successful answers.

Here are some survey question best practices:

Use simple, direct language. Wordiness and complex grammar will only lead your respondents to interpret the answer in different ways, therefore deteriorating the quality of your data.

Be specific. Ambiguity is a survey’s worst enemy. Ensure your questions focus on just one, clear topic.

Ask one question at a time. If you overload your questions with subquestions, your respondent might be incapable to answer, or even get so annoyed that they stop answering questions.

Be neutral. Questions using leading, emotional, or evocative language must be avoided as they can lead to biased responses and skew your data.

Cover all possible answers. In multiple choice and dropdown questions, provide all the alternatives you can think of, and add the other option in case you’ve forgotten something.

Be consistent. When using rating scales, make sure your rating points are the same throughout. You’ll be making your life a lot easier when it comes to analyzing the data.

Kill the jargon. Refrain from using technical jargon, acronyms, or anything that the respondent might not understand. When asking a question, be specific about the context and what you are interested in knowing. Clarity and transparency will lead to better responses.

Give people an exit. It’s okay to ask sensitive questions, but don’t expect all respondents to be happy to answer. When relevant, add the prefer not to answer option. It’s important to make your survey-taker feel comfortable taking the survey at all times.

Talk to humans, not respondents. Your respondents are humans, taking precious time out of their busy lives to answer your questions. When writing your questions, keep in mind the human being on the other side of the screen. People wouldn’t accept someone shouting “name!?”, “age!?” at them in the street. Why should they accept it in a survey. Be friendly. Be human.

How to be a ruthless question curator

Now that your goal is clear, you need to make sure your survey questions stick to your objective. Be a ruthless curator. Keep what matters, cut what doesn’t. You may be curious to know many things about your respondents, but if they don’t serve the survey’s purpose, they’re useless. Remember, unless you somehow find a survey-filling-in enthusiast, getting people to the end of your list of questions will be a challenge. Make every question count. After writing any question, ask yourself “will I actually be able to action the data?” If the answer is “no”, kill the question.

How to design a survey that looks feels good

Experience is everything. Give people a delightful survey experience, and not only will they answer questions all the way down to your last, they will gladly take your next survey too. Here’s a few handy tips on how to put survey experience first using design.

1

How to keep people engaged with short surveys

Taking an online survey can sometimes be like checking a dog’s business for a missing engagement ring—nobody wants to do it. To avoid survey fatigue, keep it as short as possible. Use question branching, or Logic Jump as we call it, to make a long survey seem shorter, by asking only relevant follow-up questions.

When running a detailed market research survey, for example, it may be hard to avoid having lots of questions. To keep your survey respondents engaged, use different question types, add images for visual stimulation, and use a friendly and conversational tone.

Ideally, an online survey should take a maximum of 5 minutes to fill. To make this experience more personal for your respondents, try using piping in your answers. For instance, you could ask for your respondent’s name at the beginning and pipe it throughout the survey. Also, a progress bar helps participants see how far they are in the survey and helps prevent dropoff.

2

How to speak to humans—one question at a time

One question at a time. It makes sense, right? Treat the survey as a conversation–don’t intimidate your precious respondent with an interrogation. Typeforms are designed to put the readers at ease by allowing them to focus only on the question at hand. One question per screen, it’s a simple rule.

3

How to welcome and thank respondents

It’s essential to explain the purpose of your survey. Take the time to include some friendly text at the beginning to explain why your respondents’ answers would be helpful to you. Take them by the hand from the start to make sure they know the hows and the whys of this process. A great way to do this is adding a Welcome screen, which you can easily customize according to your organization’s style.

Last impressions matter, too. Once the survey has been filled out, take the polite route and thank your respondents for their time in a Thank You screen. Take advantage of this last communication to include links to your website, or simply make sure they know how valuable their help has been.

4

How to structure survey questions

In order to put your respondents at ease, start your survey with general, no-brainer questions. The more sensitive and specific themes, such as demographic questions, must be kept to the end. If you’ve played your cards right, people will feel comfortable enough to tackle these questions at this point.

Another neat way to improve data quality is to randomize the order of answers in multiple choice questions. It means there is no design bias (i.e. people always selecting the first option or the one on the far left).

If you have a lot of questions to ask, question groups are a great way to organize your survey in different subsections. If you’re able to take your participant by the hand and clearly explain the different steps of the survey, you’ll get much more valuable survey results.

5

How to get answers—wherever they are

If you were an online survey, would looking good be enough? We don’t think so. You would need to be approachable at all times and anywhere your respondents are. This means your pretty questions and visuals will need to effortlessly surf from tablets or smartphones to desktops in the blink of an eye, like typeforms do. At the end of the day, they can’t say yes if you’re not there to ask… This is particularly useful for Facebook surveys, which should be designed to be completed quickly and on the go.

How to make results actionable matter

It’s essential to explain the purpose of your survey. Take the time to include some friendly text at the beginning to explain why your respondents’ answers would be helpful to you. Take them by the hand from the start to make sure they know the hows and the whys of this process. A great way to do this is adding a Welcome screen, which you can easily customize according to your organization’s style.

Last impressions matter, too. Once the survey has been filled out, take the polite route and thank your respondents for their time in a Thank You screen. Take advantage of this last communication to include links to your website, or simply make sure they know how valuable their help has been.

1

Instantly store all your results in your preferred file format

Accessing your results can be done directly from the ‘Analyze’ tab of Typeform’s build panel. There, you will be given the option of downloading your data as an Excel or CSV file. That way, you’ll be able to keep all your information together in the same place.

2

Analyze your results with your favorite tools

Your results are coming in, and you’re thinking of ways to analyze them. Typeform results can be transferred to over 500 tools. For instance, your data can be comfortably stored in Google Drive or Dropbox, or you can send your new email entries to MailChimp. Alternatively, safely send your data over to your Salesforce account. Integrations store your results quickly and efficiently, and eventually lead you to more enlightened decisions.

3

Keep a live track of your results in your own good-looking survey report

Now, if integrations are too complex a step for what you’re trying to find out, just hover over the ‘Reports’ section under the ‘Analyze’ tab. There, you’ll be able to view your general report, which automatically updates after every new entry. It’s a beautiful and easy-to-read summary, and a great place to start if you’re looking to further your investigation. Also, you can share your general report link with anyone you please.

4

Easily see how well your typeform is doing with your audience

Once you’ve released your typeform to the web, you don’t have to stay blindfolded and wait for the results to arrive. Tracking your typeform via Google Analytics allows you to better understand how your audience is reacting to your survey. Useful information such as page views, average time on page, and bounce rate can instruct you on what may have worked or not worked.

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