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Create a quiz

A quiz gives people a fun, interactive experience. For teachers, it’s a great learning tool for students that enhances the classroom experience. And for businesses, it’s perfect for generating more leads.

But what if…

  • your respondents knew their quiz results when they reached the end of your typeform?
  • they could immediately see their “personality type” after answering a few questions about themselves?
  • as a business, you could use quizzes to screen potential customers and send them to a customized Thank You screen with a special offer?

Using Logic Jump, Calculator (and a bit of patience) you can make this happen! Check out these examples below or get some inspiration from our predesigned quiz templates.

EXAMPLE 1. Level “Let’s Get It Started”

Let’s not scare you (yet) and start with a simple example. Imagine you want your respondents to find out what they are: Introvert? Extrovert? Or maybe ambivert…

Give it a try!

Your typeform would look like this:

Question 1: “It’s Saturday night and raining. What are you thinking?”

  • Option A: “Let’s go out. Spending the night inside would be an outrage!” (extrovert)
  • Option B: “Rain? What a perfect excuse to cancel all plans & drink tea at home!” (introvert)

Question 2: “You are at a coffee shop. The only available seat is in front of a stranger.”

  • Option A: “That’s okay, he seems interesting. I’ll ask him what he’s reading.” (extrovert)
  • Option B: “I’ll just subtly leave my cup on the table and abandon it, forever.” (introvert)

You’ll have three customized Thank You screens:

  • Thank You screen (results page) A: “You are an extrovert.”
  • Thank You screen (results page) B: “You are an introvert.”
  • Thank You screen (results page) C: “You are an ambivert.”

Now, if all of your questions have the same value, you will need to add Logic Jumps to the last question (in our case Question 2). It will look like this:

  • Logic Jump 1: If respondent answered: A to Q1 AND A to Q2, jump to Thank you screen A “You are an extrovert.”
  • Logic Jump 2: If respondent answered: B to Q1 AND B to Q2, jump to Thank you screen B “You are an introvert.”
  • In ALL other cases jump to Thank you screen C “You are an ambivert.”

Here is a screenshot of the Logic set:

Create a quiz 01

EXAMPLE 2. Level “You can do this!”

Let’s step it up a notch. Imagine you want to ask your respondents 7 Yes/No questions to see if they would be interested in your brand. If they reply mostly Yes to your questions, you would like to send them more information. But if they reply mostly No – never bother them again.

Look at this example:

Here’s how to do this with Typeform. Write your 7 Yes/No questions. Don’t forget to mark all of your questions as “Required”! Create 2 different Thank You screens as well. Now let’s do this!

You want your Calculator to track your respondent’s Yes and No answers and give you the number at the end. This would tell you EXACTLY how many Yes answers you had (and how many No answers as well).

Set up your Calculator to add +1 to your score each time the respondent chooses Yes. And since we want to add 0 (zero) each time the respondent chooses No, we can simply leave it at that. See below for details:

Create a quiz 03

Now time for a practice round:

What does a Calculator score of 7 mean?

The respondent chose Yes 7 times. (hoooraaay)

What does a Calculator score of 5 mean?

The respondent chose Yes 5 times. (still hoooraaay)

What does a Calculator score of 2 mean?

The respondent chose Yes 2 times. (booooooo)

Now time to set up Logic Jumps depending on the Calculator Score. Here’s what you want to accomplish: If respondents reply mostly Yes to your questions—which is at least 4 Yes answers—you’ll want them to see one Thank You screen and send them more information. However, if your respondents choose at least 4 No answers (which is 3 Yes responses or less), you’ll want them to see a different Thank You screen.

  • Thank You screen A: “Thanks so much for your time, dear customer! We hope to see you very soon :)”
  • Thank You screen B: “You know where we are in case you change your mind! We will be here waiting…”

Here, you’ll need to add Logic Jumps to the last Yes/No question. Here’s how you do this:

Create a quiz 04

The same idea works when you want to ask 4 Yes/No questions, or 23, or any other number you need!

EXAMPLE 3. Level “Master”

Now for the advanced level. Suppose you’re trying to build a quiz using 4 multiple choice questions with 4 answers: A, B, C, D. You’ll want to set up your typeform so that:

  • if the respondent answers mostly “A”, he goes to Thank You screen A
  • if the respondent answers mostly “B”, he goes to Thank You screen B
  • if the respondent answers mostly “C”, he goes to Thank You screen C
  • if the respondent answers mostly “D”, he goes to Thank You screen D

Give it a try!

For that to work, you’ll need to use your Calculator AND Logic Jumps skills. Start with creating your 4 Thank You screens. It can look anything like:

  • Thank You screen A: “You chose mostly A”
  • Thank You screen B: “You chose mostly B”
  • Thank You screen C: “You chose mostly C”
  • Thank You screen D: “You chose mostly D”

You’ll want your Calculator to store all your respondents’ A, B, C, and D answers separately. That way, you can track them separately as well. How?

For each question, set up the calculator function so that:

  • it adds +1 each time an “A” answer has been chosen
  • it adds +10 each time a “B” answer has been chosen
  • it adds +100 each time a “C” answer has been chosen
  • it adds +1000 each time a “D” answer has been chosen

Then “Units” keep track of A answers, “Tens” keep track of B answers, “Hundreds” keep track of C Answers, and “Thousands” keep track of D answers. In other words, imagine, that the final score will be a 4 digit number. You can tell how many times A, B, C and D were selected just by taking a glimpse at the total score:

Practice Round:

What does a Calculator score of 2453 mean?

Let’s read the score from the last digit to the first one: the respondent chose…

  • 3 times “A”,
  • 5 times “B”,
  • 4 times “C”,
  • and 2 times “D”.

What does a Calculator score of 164 mean (using 4 digits: 0164)?

Let’s read the score from the last digit to the first one: the respondent chose…

  • 4 times “A”,
  • 6 times “B”,
  • 1 time “C”,
  • and has not chosen “D” at all.

See below for details using our example typeform:

Create a quiz 02

Now back to our example. Let’s take a closer look at what happens if the respondent mostly answers “A”. Note that the Calculator function will assign:

  • 4 if answer “A” has been chosen 4 times
  • 13, or 103, or 1003 if answer “A” has been chosen 3 times
  • 1102, 1012, or 112 if answer “A” has been chosen 2 times and none of the other answers have been chosen twice (this way you’re ruling out situations in which the user has picked “A” twice and “D” twice, where neither “A” nor “D” constitute the majority of the answers)

Here’s how you set up Logic Jumps:

Create a quiz 05

What happens if mostly answer “B” is chosen by your respondent? The Calculator function will assign:

  • 40 if answer “B” has been chosen 4 times
  • 31, or 130, or 1030 if answer “B” has been chosen 3 times
  • 1120, 1021, or 121 if answer “B” has been chosen 2 times and none of the other answers has been chosen twice (this way you’re ruling out situations in which the user has picked “B” twice and “D” twice, where neither “B” nor “D” constitute the majority of the answers)

Here’s how you set up the Logic Jumps:

Create a quiz 06

What happens if mostly answer “C” is chosen by your respondent? The Calculator function will assign:

  • 400 if answer “C” has been chosen 4 times
  • 301 or 310 or 1300 if answer “C” has been chosen 3 times
  • 1201, 1210, or 211 if answer “C” has been chosen 2 times and none of the other answers has been chosen twice (this way you’re ruling out situations in which the user has picked “C” twice and “D” twice, where neither “C” nor “D” constitute the majority of the answers)

Here’s how you set up the Logic Jumps:

Create a quiz 07

What happens if mostly answer “D” is chosen by your respondent? The Calculator function will assign:

  • 4000 if answer “D” has been chosen 4 times
  • 3001, or 3010, or 3100 if answer “D” has been chosen 3 times
  • 2011, 2101, or 2110 if answer “D” has been chosen 2 times and none of the other answers has been chosen twice (this way you’re ruling out situations in which the user has picked “D” twice and “B” twice, where neither “D” nor “B” constitute the majority of the answers)

Here’s how you set up the Logic Jumps:

Create a quiz 08

Using our idea, we were able to find all the Score values necessary to build our Logic Jump and have respondents “jump” to different Thank You screens depending on their answers.

Read more about making quizzes with Typeform.

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Thanks!

A quiz gives people a fun, interactive experience. For teachers, it’s a great learning tool for students that can enhance the classroom experience. And for businesses, it’s perfect for generating more leads, offering shareable content to attract people to your brand

It’s easy to make a quiz with Typeform using the PRO features Calculator and Logic Jump, along with custom Thank You Screens. Read on to find out how it’s done using the example of our Brand Logo Quiz, which we used at Typeform for a series of successful social media campaigns. You can adapt this to create your own multiple choice quiz.

At the end of the article, you can check out some other examples of quizzes we’ve built and test them out for yourself.

How to create a logo quiz

  1. We’re going to use Question groups to organize the quiz into difficulty levels. Create the first Question group by clicking on the corresponding icon in the Blocks panel. Enter text to introduce the first level.Screenshot showing where to find the Question groups block
  2. Add a Multiple choice question to 1a, using the Block settings drop-down menu to select the question type. Enter your question text and type in four possible answers for our first logo, which will be the Michelin man.Screenshot showing how to add a multiple choice question block
  3. Now to upload the logo. Click the ‘+Add’ button next to Image in the Multiple choice settings panel on the left-hand side. Hit ‘Upload’ and navigate to the image file on your computer to insert it.Screenshot showing how to upload an image to your quiz
  4. Repeat this process, adding all your Multiple choice questions and logo images for the first level. You can preview how the quiz is shaping up in the live preview, on the right.Screenshot showing level one of quiz
  5. Now let’s set up the score calculations. To do this, select the first question in the first Question group and click the Calculator icon in the left-hand toolbar. Hit the ‘Add a calculation’ button. Select the correct answer – Michelin Man in this case – from the drop-down and add one to the Score. Repeat this process for all of the questions in the Question group we’ve created.Screenshot showing how to add score to multiple choice quiz question
  6. Go ahead and repeat steps one to six for the other two Question groups. We made the second group of questions a little harder, and the third group devilishly tricky. Remember to use the Calculator to add 1 to the Score for every correct answer.

    For the third Question group, we’ve used the Short text block and apply a score of one if the answer matches the text (you can include variations of an answer if you like too, as below).
    Screenshot showing how to apply scores to short question answers
  7. Let’s set up some custom Thank You screens to show the contestant their scores at the end. We’re only going to allow people to proceed to the next round if they hit a certain score. With this in mind, we’re going to create four Thank You screens: one for people who drop out in the first round, one for those who drop out in the second round, one for those who finish the quiz, and a special one for people who get all answers correct.

    The end result will look like this in the Create panel:Screenshot showing what the quiz Thank You screens will look like
  8. To create a Thank You screen, select the icon from the Blocks panel and enter the text. Hit the ‘+Add’ button next to the Piping option in the Thank You screen settings then select ‘Score’ from the drop-down to display your contestant’s score in the Thank You screen.Screenshot showing how to pipe score into Thank You screen
  9. Now we’ll use Logic Jumps to block contestants from continuing to the next round of the quiz unless they hit a minimum number of correct answers.

    Start by highlighting the last question of the first Question group, and click the Logic Jump icon in the left-hand panel. Click the ‘Add a Logic Jump’ button and set it up so that if the score is more than three the next Question group will be displayed. If not, it will go to the first Thank You screen we created (A).

    Screenshot showing how to add Logic Jump to Level One score

  10. Do the same for the last question of the second Question group. This time the respondent will need to have scored a total of 8 out the 10 questions so far to proceed. If not, we’ll send them to Thank You screen B.Screenshot showing how to add Logic Jump to Level Two
  11. For the final Question group, we’ll use Logic Jump to send them to Thank You screen D if the score is 15 (the congratulations screen), or Thank You screen C if it’s not.Screenshot showing how to add Logic Jump to Level Three
  12. We’re almost done, but let’s make our quiz a bit prettier. Create a Welcome screen for the quiz by clicking on the corresponding icon in the Blocks panel. Enter some intro text then use the Welcome screen settings panel to change the text displayed in the button.Screenshot showing how to a Welcome screen to your quiz
  13. Now let’s tweak the design a bit. Click the droplet icon on the sidebar to open the design settings. Click on ‘Customize’ to make your own theme. In this case, we’ve tinkered with the font, colors, and background image.Screenshot showing how to customize the quiz design

Get inspired

Now that you know how to create a multiple choice quiz with Typeform, it’s time to let your creative juices run wild. Whether you want to attract customers, educate students, or test employees, the scope of your quiz is limited only by your imagination.

Take a look at our quiz templates if you want some extra inspiration, and go ahead and try out these two other examples, too:

Harry Potter Quiz

Math quiz