Create a personality quiz

Online personality quizzes are extremely popular and make a great way to bring people to your brand.

Personality tests are used by marketers to increase traffic, collect leads, and connect customers to their brand. They can also be used for lead qualification by asking people to respond to a series of yes/no questions to filter out respondents who don’t match your target audience.

There are several ways you can create a personality quiz with Typeform, which vary in complexity. Here we walk you through three ways in which you can build effective personality tests.

Example 1: Simple personality type test

Let’s not scare you (yet) and start with a simple example. Imagine you want your respondents to find out what they are: Introvert? Extrovert? Or maybe ambivert…

Give it a try!

Your typeform would look like this:

Question 1: “It’s Saturday night and raining. What are you thinking?”

  • Option A: “Let’s go out. Spending the night inside would be an outrage!” (extrovert)
  • Option B: “Rain? What a perfect excuse to cancel all plans & drink tea at home!” (introvert)

Question 2: “You are at a coffee shop. The only available seat is in front of a stranger.”

  • Option A: “That’s okay, they seem interesting. I’ll ask them what they’re reading.” (extrovert)
  • Option B: “I’ll just subtly leave my cup on the table and abandon it, forever.” (introvert)

You’ll have three customized Thank You Screens:

  • Thank You Screen (results page) A: “You are an extrovert.”
  • Thank You Screen (results page) B: “You are an introvert.”
  • Thank You Screen (results page) C: “You are an ambivert.”

Now, if all of your questions have the same value, you will need to add Logic Jumps to the last question (in our case Question 2). It will look like this:

  • Logic Jump 1: If the respondent answered: A to Q1 AND A to Q2, jump to Thank You Screen A “You are an extrovert.”
  • Logic Jump 2: If the respondent answered: B to Q1 AND B to Q2, jump to Thank You Screen B “You are an introvert.”
  • In ALL other cases jump to Thank You Screen C “You are an ambivert.”

Here is a screenshot of the Logic set:

Logic jumps for simple personality quiz

Example 2: Lead qualification test

Let’s step it up a notch. Imagine you want to ask your respondents a series of Yes/No questions to see if they would be interested in your brand. If they reply mostly Yes to your questions, you would like to send them more information. But if they reply mostly No – you’ll never bother them again.

Look at this example:

Here’s how to do this with Typeform:

1. Write your seven Yes/No questions. Don’t forget to mark all of your questions as “Required”.

Screenshot showing Yes/No questions as required blocks

2. Create two different Thank You Screens. One of them will be shown to people who qualify as leads, another to those who aren’t a fit.

Screenshot showing how to create Thank You screens

3. You want your Calculator to track your respondent’s Yes and No answers and give you the number at the end. This would tell you EXACTLY how many Yes answers you had (and how many No answers as well).

Set up your Calculator to add +1 to your score each time the respondent chooses Yes. And since we want to add 0 (zero) each time the respondent chooses No, we can simply leave it at that:

Screenshot showing calculator setup

4. Now time to set up Logic Jumps depending on the Calculator Score. Here’s what you want to accomplish: If respondents reply mostly Yes to your questions—which is at least 4 Yes answers—you’ll want them to see the first Thank You Screen and send them more information. However, if your respondents choose at least 4 No answers (which is 3 Yes responses or less), you’ll want them to see the second Thank You Screen.

Here, you’ll need to add Logic Jumps to the final Yes/No question as follows:

Screenshot showing Logic Jump setup for personality quiz

The same principle works when you want to ask four Yes/No questions, or 23, or any other number you need!

Example 3: Advanced personality test

Now for the advanced level. Suppose you’re trying to build a quiz using four multiple choice questions with four answers: A, B, C, D. You’ll want to set up your typeform so that:

  • If the respondent answers mostly “A”, they go to Thank You Screen A
  • If the respondent answers mostly “B”, they go to Thank You Screen B
  • If the respondent answers mostly “C”, they go to Thank You Screen C
  • If the respondent answers mostly “D”, they go to Thank You Screen D
  • If the respondent answers each question differently, they go to Thank You Screen E

Give it a try:

1. For this to work, you’ll need to use your Calculator AND Logic Jumps skills. Start with creating your four Thank You screens. It can look anything like:

  • Thank You Screen A: “You chose mostly A”
  • Thank You Screen B: “You chose mostly B”
  • Thank You Screen C: “You chose mostly C”
  • Thank You Screen D: “You chose mostly D”
  • Thank You Screen E: “ Your answers are inconclusive”

In this case, we’ve been a little more elaborate with our descriptions:

Screenshot showing how to set up the thank you screens for the personality quiz

2. You’ll want your Calculator to store all your respondents’ A, B, C, and D answers separately. That way, you can track them separately as well. How?

For each question, set up the calculator function so that:

  • It adds +1 each time an “A” answer has been chosen
  • It adds +10 each time a “B” answer has been chosen
  • It adds +100 each time a “C” answer has been chosen
  • It adds +1000 each time a “D” answer has been chosen

Screenshot showing how to apply calculations to the four question options

The “Units” keep track of A answers, “Tens” keep track of B answers, “Hundreds” keep track of C Answers, and “Thousands” keep track of D answers. In other words, imagine, that the final score will be a 4 digit number. You can tell how many times A, B, C and D were selected just by taking a glimpse at the total score.

Practice Round:

What does a Calculator score of 2453 mean?

Let’s read the score from the last digit to the first one: the respondent chose…

  • 3 times “A” (the ‘units’)
  • 5 times “B” (the ‘tens’)
  • 4 times “C”, (the ‘hundreds’)
  • and 2 times “D”, (the ‘thousands’)

What does a Calculator score of 164 mean (using 4 digits: 0164)?

Let’s read the score from the last digit to the first one: the respondent chose…

  • 4 times “A”,
  • 6 times “B”,
  • 1 time “C”,
  • and has not chosen “D” at all.

3. Now back to our example. Let’s take a closer look at what happens if the respondent mostly answers “A”. Note that the Calculator function will assign:

  • 4 if answer “A” has been chosen 4 times
  • 13, or 103, or 1003 if answer “A” has been chosen 3 times
  • 1102, 1012, or 112 if answer “A” has been chosen 2 times and none of the other answers have been chosen twice (this way you’re ruling out situations in which the user has picked “A” twice and “D” twice, where neither “A” nor “D” constitutes the majority of the answers)

Here’s how you set up the Logic Jumps:

Screenshot showing Logic Jump setup for mostly As

4. What happens if mostly answer “B” is chosen by your respondent? The Calculator function will assign:

  • 40 if answer “B” has been chosen 4 times
  • 31, or 130, or 1030 if answer “B” has been chosen 3 times
  • 1120, 1021, or 121 if answer “B” has been chosen 2 times and none of the other answers has been chosen twice (this way you’re ruling out situations in which the user has picked “B” twice and “D” twice, where neither “B” nor “D” constitutes the majority of the answers)

Here’s how you set up the Logic Jumps:

Screenshot showing Logic Jump setup for mostly Bs

5. What happens if mostly answer “C” is chosen by your respondent? The Calculator function will assign:

  • 400 if answer “C” has been chosen 4 times
  • 301 or 310 or 1300 if answer “C” has been chosen 3 times
  • 1201, 1210, or 211 if answer “C” has been chosen 2 times and none of the other answers has been chosen twice (this way you’re ruling out situations in which the user has picked “C” twice and “D” twice, where neither “C” nor “D” constitutes the majority of the answers)

Here’s how you set up the Logic Jumps:

Screenshot showing Logic Jump setup for mostly Cs

6. What happens if mostly answer “D” is chosen by your respondent? The Calculator function will assign:

  • 4000 if answer “D” has been chosen 4 times
  • 3001, or 3010, or 3100 if answer “D” has been chosen 3 times
  • 2011, 2101, or 2110 if answer “D” has been chosen 2 times and none of the other answers has been chosen twice (this way you’re ruling out situations in which the user has picked “D” twice and “B” twice, where neither “D” nor “B” constitute the majority of the answers)

Here’s how you set up the Logic Jumps:

Screenshot showing how to setup Logic Jumps for mainly D answers

Using our idea, we were able to find all the Score values necessary to build our Logic Jump and have respondents “jump” to different Thank You Screens depending on their answers.

Take quizzes to the next level

If you want to build a quiz that awards scores for correct answers then go check out our Create a quiz tutorial. If you want even more inspiration in terms what you can do with quizzes in Typeform, take a look at these examples.